Tag Archives: Jane Austen

Blog Posts, Articles, and Reports To Read: December 2013

Blog Posts, Articles, and Reports To Read: March and February 2012

Jane and the Canterbury Tale by Stephanie Barron

Stephanie Barron‘s latest book, Jane and the Canterbury Tale (New York:  Bantam Books, 2011), is at least as good as her last one, Jane and the Madness of Lord Byron, which I wrote about in January. One of the main reasons I enjoyed the most recent one so much is that Barron, for the most part, abandoned the pretext of Jane writing about events in her journal or letters.  As a result, the book flowed much better.

Jane and the Madness of Lord Byron by Stephanie Barron

I think that Stephanie Barron‘s latest Jane Austen mystery, Jane and the Madness of Lord Byron (New York:  Bantam Books, 2010), is probably her best to date.  I’ve added this novel, and her next one, which is apparently to be published this year, to my list.

In “A Few Questions for Stephanie Barron” at the end of the book, Barron states that “there’s no record of . . . her [Jane Austen] having met Lord Byron[, though] she read Byron’s poetry . . . and they had acquaintances in common” (335).

Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor by Stephanie Barron

I enjoyed Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave (New York:  Bantam Books, 1996), Stephanie Barron‘s first Jane Austen mystery.  At times Barron did a good job of imitating Austen’s writing style.

Barron has written eight other books in the series:

Barron also writes mysteries as Francine Mathews.

As I wrote last year, I’ve read mystery novels with Leonardo da Vinci as the detective.  I wonder if anyone has written murder mysteries where William Shakespeare or Agatha Christie is the sleuth.

101 Things You Didn’t Know About Jane Austen by Patrice Hannon

My sister saw this book and bought it for me.  In 101 Things You Didn’t Know About Jane Austen: The Truth About the World’s Most Intriguing Literary Heroine (New York:  Fall River Press, 2007), Patrice Hannon takes a novel approach to a biography.  Short, focused chapters make for easy reading and, along with the limited length of the book, will attract lay readers (i.e., non-English majors or professors).  Hannon relates events and people in Austen’s novels to those in her own life.

Of course, the title is a bit confusing because Austen isn’t really a “literary heroine”; that role is reserved for the protagonist of a literary work.