Tag Archives: encyclopedia

Research Report: Sharing Economy

Alternative Terms

  • access economy
  • circular economy
  • collaborative consumption
  • collaborative economy
  • digital economy
  • gig economy
  • on-demand economy
  • peer economy
  • uberisation

Encyclopedia Articles

Websites

Books

  • Aigrain, Philippe, and Suzanne Aigrain.  Sharing:  Culture and the Economy in the Internet Age.
  • Chase, Robin.  Peers Inc:  How People and Platforms Are Inventing the Collaborative Economy and Reinventing Capitalism.
  • Cohen, Boyd, and Pablo Munoz.  The Emergence of the Urban Entrepreneur:  How the Growth of Cities and the Sharing Economy Are Driving a New Breed of Innovators.
  • Ghosh, Rishab Aiyer.  CODE:  Collaborative Ownership and the Digital Economy.
  • Howard, Billee.  We-commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy.
  • Kostakis, Vasilis, and Michel Bausens.  Nework Society and Future Scenarios for a Collaborative Economy..
  • Kramer, Bryan.  Shareology:  How Sharing Is Powering the Human Economy.
  • Lansley, Stewart.  A Sharing Economy:  How Social Wealth Funds Can Reduce Inequality and Help Balance the Books.
  • Stephany, Alex.  The Business of Sharing:  Making It in the New Sharing Economy.
  • Sundararajan, Arun.  The Sharing Economy:  The End of Employment and the rise of Crowd-Based Capitalism.

Reports

Visuals

Web-Based Articles, Blog Posts, Etc.

Research Journal Assignment #5

Post in Your Blog:

Post three times  in your blog (research journal), using the numbers, letters, and phrases in bold as the titles of your respective posts:

RJA #5a: Reference Articles–Use the reference works listed here and any others you know of to find articles and definitions related to your research topic.  In your research journal, record where you looked and what kind of information you found.  Bookmark sites you may want to use in your Delicious account.

For each relevant article that you find in a printed reference work and might use, record the following information:

  • Name(s) of author(s) of the article
  • Title of the article
  • Title of reference work
  • Place of publication (include state if needed)
  • Name of publisher
  • Date of publication
  • Page number(s)

For an online reference work, you will also need the web address and the date you accessed the article.

In addition, record the following information in your research journal for each search you conduct:

  • Resource searched
  • Keywords used
  • Search strategies used (including operators and types of searches)
  • Date of search
  • Number of hits
  • Relevance of hits (on a scale of 1 to 5)

In the future, if you find additional reference articles that you might use, add the information to this post.

RJA #5b: Books–Using any of the libraries listed here or any of the websites listed or linked here, identify books on or related to your topic (You may need to broaden your search some.) You may request books from other libraries through Prospector using your county library card number. You may also use your local public library, which you can search through the Colorado Virtual Library, or any bookstore. Once you have identified books that you want to read, go ahead and check them out, put them on hold, or purchase them. (The last option is entirely up to you.)

If you have trouble with your research, in addition to the librarians at your college and county libraries, you may use one of the ask-a-librarian services listed on the same page as the libraries.

In your research journal (blog), record the following information for each book you find that you want to use:

  • Name(s) of author(s), editor(s), translator(s), and/or compiler(s)
  • Title and subtitle of the book
  • Edition number or information
  • Number(s) of volume used
  • Name of series
  • Place of publication (include state if needed)
  • Name of publisher
  • Date of publication (copyright)

If you identify any electronic books that would be useful, you also need to record the web address, the site where you accessed it, and the date you accessed it.

In addition, record the following information in your research journal for each search you conduct:

  • Resource searched
  • Keywords used
  • Search strategies used (including operators and types of searches)
  • Date of search
  • Number of hits
  • Relevance of hits (on a scale of 1 to 5)

If you do request assistance from a librarian, either in person or online, please record the incident in your research journal.

In the future, if you find additional books that you might use, add the information to this post.

RJA #5c:  Search String Check–Go to two of your classmates’ blogs (ENG 1020, ENG 122) and check their search strings (Research Journal Assignment #4b).  In comment on those posts, offer suggestions for improving their search strings or confirm that they are correct.  In your own blog, post links to the web addresses of the posts you commented on (not the main addresses for the blogs).

Use the department and course number (ENG 1020 or ENG 122) and other appropriate tags (”Labels” on Blogger) for each of the three posts.

Research Journal Assignment #4

Post three times  in your blog (research journal), using the numbers, letters, and phrases in bold as the titles of your respective posts:

4a: Finding Reference Articles–Use the reference works listed here and any others you know of to find articles and definitions related to your research topic.  In your research journal, record where you looked and what kind of information you found.  Bookmark sites you may want to use in your Delicious account.

For each relevant article that you find in a printed reference work and might use, record the following information:

  • Name(s) of author(s) of the article
  • Title of the article
  • Title of reference work
  • Place of publication (include state if needed)
  • Name of publisher
  • Date of publication
  • Page number(s)

For an online reference work, you will also need the web address and the date you accessed the article.

In addition, record the following information in your research journal for each search you conduct:

  • Resource searched
  • Keywords used
  • Search strategies used (including operators and types of searches)
  • Date of search
  • Number of hits
  • Relevance of hits (on a scale of 1 to 5)

4b: Finding Books–Using any of the libraries listed here, identify books on or related to your topic (You may need to broaden your search some.) You may request books from other libraries through Prospector using your county library card number. You may also use your local public library, which you can search through the Colorado Virtual Library, or any bookstore. Once you have identified books that you want to read, go ahead and check them out, put them on hold, or purchase them. (The last option is entirely up to you.)

If you have trouble with your research, in addition to the librarians at your college and county libraries, you may use one of the ask-a-librarian services listed on the same page as the libraries.

In your research journal (blog), record the following information for each book you find that you want to use:

  • Name(s) of author(s), editor(s), translator(s), and/or compiler(s)
  • Title and subtitle of the book
  • Edition number or information
  • Number(s) of volume used
  • Name of series
  • Place of publication (include state if needed)
  • Name of publisher
  • Date of publication (copyright)

If you identify any electronic books that would be useful, you also need to record the web address, the site where you accessed it, and the date you accessed it.

In addition, record the following information in your research journal for each search you conduct:

  • Resource searched
  • Keywords used
  • Search strategies used (including operators and types of searches)
  • Date of search
  • Number of hits
  • Relevance of hits (on a scale of 1 to 5)

If you do request assistance from a librarian, either in person or online, please record the incident in your research journal.

4c:  Checking Search StringsGo to two of your classmates’ blogs (ENG 1020, ENG 122) and check their search strings (Research Journal Assignment #3b).  In a comment on that post, offer suggestions for improving their search strings or confirm that they are correct.  In your own blog, post the web addresses of the pages where you commented.

Use the department and course number (ENG 1020 or ENG 122) and other appropriate tags (”Labels” on Blogger) for each of the three posts.

Credible Alternatives to Wikipedia

Wikipedia has its place, but I do not allow students to cite it in an academic paper.  It simply is not a credible source.  However, I do use it myself as a starting point for personal research, particularly on technical or popular topics, and it often has links to more credible sources of information.

There are alternatives to Wikipedia that deserve more attention and participation:

  • Scholarpedia is a “free peer reviewed encyclopedia written by scholars from all around the world.”
  • Digital Universe is “an ever-growing array of commercial-free portals mapping the highest-quality Internet destinations, as recommended by experts recognized in their fields. These experts review public contributions, create context and attest to the reliability, integrity, and accuracy of the portals.”
  • Citizendium is an effort to create “the world’s most trusted encyclopedia and knowledge base” where the “general public and experts collaborate, using their real names.”

Too Little Too Late for Wikipedia

I just read in a post on the Socialtext blog about an article in the Telegraph, which states that Wikipedia “is to stop people from editing entries after a series of questionable updates cast a shadow over its accuracy and reliability.” Does anyone really believe that Wikipedia has ever been accurate and reliable? This is certainly a case of too little too late. I won’t let my students cite an article from Wikipedia in any papers they submit. I know of some faculty members who require their students to use Wikipedia but only to demonstrate how inaccuate and unreliable it is.

Citizendium, an encyclopedia project that aims “at credibility and quality, not just quantity,” and Scholarpedia, a “free peer reviewed encyclopedia written by scholars from all around the world” are already traveling on the path that Wikipedia seems to want to take.